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AL LT322 @ London Euston bus station

Streatham Photos, flickr - August 30, 2017 - 8:35pm

ianjpoole posted a photo:

AL LT322 @ London Euston bus station

Arriva London Wright Borismaster LTZ1322 LT322 working route 59 Telford Avenue Streatham Hill to London Kings Cross

Categories: Photos

AL LT732 @ London Euston bus station

Streatham Photos, flickr - August 30, 2017 - 8:35pm

ianjpoole posted a photo:

AL LT732 @ London Euston bus station

Arriva London Wright Borismaster LTZ1732 LT732 working route 59 London Kings Cross to Telford Avenue Streatham Hill

Categories: Photos

Acknowledgement of Deeds by Commissioners of the Common Pleas of Catherine Meigh wife of Charles Meigh the Younger, Liverpool, Lancashire and Staffordshire. 1860. p1

Streatham Photos, flickr - August 28, 2017 - 8:48pm

North West Kent Family History Society posted a photo:

Acknowledgement of Deeds by Commissioners of the Common Pleas of Catherine Meigh wife of Charles Meigh the Younger, Liverpool, Lancashire and Staffordshire. 1860. p1

Acknowledgement of Deeds by Commissioners of the Common Pleas of Catherine Meigh wife of Charles Meigh the Younger, Liverpool, Lancashire and Staffordshire. 18th June 1860.

The ‘property’ was a part share in the residuary Estate of Richard Hatherfield, deceased, subject to the life interest of Ann Hatherfield, mother of Richard.
Catherine Peck married Charles Meigh 10th October 1849 at St Leonard, Streatham, Lambeth.

The 1861 census shows them living at Meaford and Oulton, Staffordshire. Charles was an Earthenware Manufacturer. Others mentioned: William Peck.

The two Commissioners were
Sometimes known as Married Women’s Deeds or Acknowledgement of Deeds by Married Women. A Document to record that a Wife was of full age, competent to understand, had been examined apart from her husband and voluntarily consented to the sale of Land and Property. The main intention was to ensure that a wife could not claim the right of Dower from the purchaser after her husband’s death. Single women and Widows had the right to own properties in their own right so were not covered by this 1833 Act.

The Declaration: Sometimes this first declaration could be signed by someone other than an Attorney and Commissioner (Gentleman, Farmer etc.) who knew the woman. Normally it was signed by an Attorney who was a Commissioner of the Court of Common pleas. Then signed by a second Commissioner who declared he had no knowledge or interest in the transaction and as far as he was aware neither did the first Commissioner. Sometimes the document would also be signed by another Commissioner (for Oaths) or by a Judge in his Chambers.

A second document, the Certificate, gave the names of the two Commissioners, wife and husband. A précis of the Indenture connected to the sale was given, naming all who were named in the indenture.

Categories: Photos

Acknowledgement of Deeds by Commissioners of the Common Pleas of Catherine Meigh wife of Charles Meigh the Younger, Liverpool, Lancashire and Staffordshire. 1860. p2

Streatham Photos, flickr - August 28, 2017 - 8:48pm

North West Kent Family History Society posted a photo:

Acknowledgement of Deeds by Commissioners of the Common Pleas of Catherine Meigh wife of Charles Meigh the Younger, Liverpool, Lancashire and Staffordshire. 1860. p2

Acknowledgement of Deeds by Commissioners of the Common Pleas of Catherine Meigh wife of Charles Meigh the Younger, Liverpool, Lancashire and Staffordshire. 18th June 1860.

The ‘property’ was a part share in the residuary Estate of Richard Hatherfield, deceased, subject to the life interest of Ann Hatherfield, mother of Richard.
Catherine Peck married Charles Meigh 10th October 1849 at St Leonard, Streatham, Lambeth.

The 1861 census shows them living at Meaford and Oulton, Staffordshire. Charles was an Earthenware Manufacturer. Others mentioned: William Peck.

The two Commissioners were
Sometimes known as Married Women’s Deeds or Acknowledgement of Deeds by Married Women. A Document to record that a Wife was of full age, competent to understand, had been examined apart from her husband and voluntarily consented to the sale of Land and Property. The main intention was to ensure that a wife could not claim the right of Dower from the purchaser after her husband’s death. Single women and Widows had the right to own properties in their own right so were not covered by this 1833 Act.

The Declaration: Sometimes this first declaration could be signed by someone other than an Attorney and Commissioner (Gentleman, Farmer etc.) who knew the woman. Normally it was signed by an Attorney who was a Commissioner of the Court of Common pleas. Then signed by a second Commissioner who declared he had no knowledge or interest in the transaction and as far as he was aware neither did the first Commissioner. Sometimes the document would also be signed by another Commissioner (for Oaths) or by a Judge in his Chambers.

A second document, the Certificate, gave the names of the two Commissioners, wife and husband. A précis of the Indenture connected to the sale was given, naming all who were named in the indenture.

Categories: Photos

66732 'GBRf The First Decade', Streatham

Streatham Photos, flickr - August 25, 2017 - 1:28pm

looper23 posted a photo:

66732 'GBRf The First Decade', Streatham

Categories: Photos

66732 'GBRf The First Decade', Streatham

Streatham Photos, flickr - August 25, 2017 - 1:28pm

looper23 posted a photo:

66732 'GBRf The First Decade', Streatham

Categories: Photos